fiber

Possibility... where dreams come to life

Possibility... where dreams come to life

Hi friends! Today we're celebrating! A year ago I embarked upon a true life-changing experience: I took a class. But it turned out to be so much more than that. It was Kelly Rae Roberts' "Flying Lessons", and the name couldn't be more appropriate, because it's really about teaching creative people to find their wings, open them and take flight. Kelly Rae has been an amazing training pilot / mama-bird, sharing her experiences, cheering us on, and also helping us deal with our fears.

Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille
Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille

We were over 500 brave little hatchlings in that nest, and today we are a beautiful, joyful and determined flock, fiercely supporting each other on our creative journeys. We are, as Kelly Rae says, "Possibilitarians":

"Possibilitarians = Possibility-fueled visionaries who stepped into their own limitlessness. Against the grain, against the odds. Just because . . . they had a calling they couldn’t ignore."

And who want to share their journeys so that others can feel they are given permision to follow their calling too, so that "just like that, the impossible simply . . . isn’t."

Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille
Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille

I made this little mixed media nest over the summer, as I was settling into my new studio. This room truly feels like a nest to me, because it is a safe, soft and inspiring place where my own creative dreams can grow, mature and hatch, before spreading their wings and taking flight into the world.

Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille
Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille

I believe our dreams, the ones that truly are this "calling we can't ignore", are not meant to stay dormant inside our nest, as warm and cozy as it may be. Eventually we'll need to crack that shell and hatch. And as any baby bird, we'll be small, and vulnerable, and awkward until our feathers grow.

Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille
Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille

But we're not alone. There are others in the nest with us, and if we're in this together, then it's no longer so scary. With the gentle help and example of those who have spread their wings before us, we can take the leap!

Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille
Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille

There will most probably be times when we stumble, and fall, and doubt, and get hurt. And maybe we'll never be the most gracious or colourful of birds... But who cares, as long as we can FLY!

Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille
Possibility, Mixed media plaster and fiber nest © 2013 Laly Mille

This post is part of the Flying Lessons Blog Circle! A few of us are writing about being a possibilitarian today, so follow THIS LINK to read my friend Karrlin's take on the subject, and then you can follow the link to the next blog, and the next and so on, until you circle back here!

Are you a Possibilitarian too? Then join the tribe on Kelly Rae's blog HERE! And read inspiring, possibility-filled stories HERE on her Possibilitarian Project page.

What about you? What dreams or crazy projects are you hatching these days?...

i'm_a_possibilitarian_250x250
i'm_a_possibilitarian_250x250

Too web or not too web

 Too web or not too web

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You might remember that last summer I attended a fiber arts workshop (Sacred White) at one of my favorite museums, the Musée Jean-Lurçat in Angers (France). Well, last week I had the great pleasure of doing it again! These workshops are always centered around the current exhibition, and this time it was about the 10th international triennial exhibition of mini-textiles. This exhibition is always so amazing, so varied and original. If you come to the Loire Valley before the end of May, you should definitely stop by!

Here are a few words about the exhibition, borrowed from the museum's website (what? me, lazy?...)

"For the 7th consecutive edition in Angers, the Musée Jean-Lurçat et de la tapisserie contemporaine is organizing and hosting the 10th international triennial exhibition of mini-textiles. This year’s theme, proposed by Pierre Daquin is: “Too web or not to web”. For over fifteen years, the city of Angers and its contemporary tapestry museum have been home to this eagerly-awaited gathering between contemporary textile creation and the public. Each artist presents a work that is made by using thread or another similar material. The work’s dimensions should not be greater than 12 x 12 x 12 cm (in surface or volume). The small format marries talent and diversity: the triennial attracts established and emerging artists and is a place where the young and not-so-young rub shoulders." (source: http://musees.angers.fr/langues-etrangeres/english/the-exhibitions/10th-international-triennial-of-mini-textiles/index.html)

(NB: 12 cm is approximately 4,7")

Reel detail by Laly Mille
Reel detail by Laly Mille

So, in the museum's little studio, we each started working on our own little weaving loom! The theme of the exhibition is a play on the word "web" (textile and internet) so we were supposed to keep this in mind as well as the "minitextile" format. I don't know why, but I instantly felt that my textile's look should be the opposite of "technological". I didn't want it to be smooth or geometrical. On the contrary, I needed it to feel natural, with contrasted textures and colors reminiscent of moss, bark, grass, feathers and sea mist... I needed it to feel messy, soft and rugged, like life is, something you couldn't help touching... I needed it to feel the opposite of virtual, I needed it to feel REAL.

Reel detail by Laly Mille
Reel detail by Laly Mille

Then, when I took it off the loom, I started to stroke it and twist it. I decided it shouldn't remain flat and ultimately I gave it a curved shape, like a nest. And then it needed to hold something inside it, some sort of egg... I was still thinking about our assigned theme, about virtual vs. real, about how the web affects our real lives.

I looked up the word "real" ("réel" in French) on Wikipedia and there, in front of my computer, I thought: "So this is 'real'... oh but at the same time it's not, because I'm reading it on my computer screen, so it's a virtual thing too... this is fun!" So I decided to push it a bit further: I printed the text (on a real sheet of paper, with real ink) then cut it into strips that I glued to one another so that it became a really long strip (deconstruction / reconstruction of reality??). I rolled it and locked it into a little clear, smooth, not-so-natural plastic bubble... There is my egg! Its round shape could figure the Earth, and I wrapped some wired string around it (connections? prison?...)

Reel detail by Laly Mille

It's funny how the first part of the work was very intuitive and the second part weirdly intellectual... But after all, on Wikipedia, the last word of the definition of the word "réel" is... "psychose" (psychosis)! So I guess in some way it makes sense...

Reel detail by Laly Mille